Ennearam by tai tran

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Tai Tran

Join date: 22/07/2018

Ennearam by tai tran

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Post Date: 22/07/2018, 11:22
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1. THE ENNEAGRAM tai tran Hien T. Nguyen May 2007 2. The Enneagram <ul><li>Is the ancient system of personality types </li></ul><ul><li>Linking personality to spirit </li></ul> 3. Diagrams 4. Overview 5. The Three Triads 6. Triad: Head <ul><li>5,6,7 tend to respond to life through their thoughts </li></ul><ul><li>Vivid imaginations </li></ul><ul><li>Strong ability to analyze and correlate ideas. </li></ul><ul><li>Thinking is a way of pre-empting fear </li></ul> 7. Triad: Heart <ul><li>2,3,4 operate in the world through relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Image: Concerned with how others see and relate to them </li></ul><ul><li>Quick sense and respond to others’ needs or moods </li></ul><ul><li>Successful relationships keep at bay the sense of emptiness and yearning </li></ul> 8. Triad: Belly/Gut <ul><li>8,9,1 tend to ‘be’ in the world through action </li></ul><ul><li>Their instinct is to do </li></ul><ul><li>Self-forgetting types </li></ul> 9. Head center: Fixations and Holy Ideas <ul><li>Fixation: Habitual mental preoccupation of focus of attention </li></ul><ul><li>Holy Ideas: The state of being which is experienced, rather than thought of, by the head center when it is free of the fixation </li></ul> 10. Fixations (cont) 11. Heart center: Passion and Holy Virtue <ul><li>Passion: The habitual preoccupation or focus of the heart center </li></ul><ul><li>Virtue: the essential state of being experienced in the heart </li></ul> 12. Belly center: Self-preservation 13. Belly center: Social Instinct 14. Belly center: Sexual 15. Wings <ul><li>Each type has 2 wings on either side on the circle </li></ul><ul><li>Example: Five-ish Six is more withdrawn, Seven-ish Six becomes more playful </li></ul> 16. The Enneagram and MBTI 17. Motivation – Behavior – Development 18. Focus of attention 19. Functions 20. Interpersonal Roles 1. The Reformer (Improving) The Conscientious Teacher 8. The Challenger (Empowering) The Self- Confident Authority 9. The Peacemaker (Mediating) The Comforting Optimist Influence others 6. The Troubleshooter (Implementing) The Dependable Associate 7. The Enthusiast (Popularizing) The Joyful Visionary 5. The Investigator (Discovering) The Perceptive Expert Looking into future 2. The Mentor (Supporting) The Thoughtful Contributor 3. The Achiever (Communicating) The Competent Pragmatist 4. The Designer (Creating) The Intuitive Originator Self development Cooperator Initiator Soloist Area of concern Social functions 21. Disruptive Roles 1. The Reformer (Improving) The Rigid Scorekeeper 8. The Challenger (Empowering) The Heavy-Handed Taskmaster 9. The Peacemaker (Mediating) The Passive Wishful Thinker Influence others 6. The Troubleshooter (Implementing) The Ambivalent Skeptic 7. The Enthusiast (Popularizing) The Scattered Chatterbox 5. The Investigator (Discovering) The Detached Technician Looking into future 2. The Mentor (Supporting) The Self-Important Busybody 3. The Achiever (Communicating) The Slippery Operator 4. The Designer (Creating) The Temperamental Withholder Self development Cooperator Initiator Soloist Area of concern Social functions 22. Leadership 23. Inadequate Nurturing Environment 24. Appearance Illustrations 25. The Day in Enneagram 26. Title <ul><li>Menu </li></ul><ul><li>Content </li></ul> 27. The Nine Types 28. 1. The Perfectionist/Reformer/Worker/Critic <ul><li>ONES at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Ethical </li></ul><ul><li>Reliable </li></ul><ul><li>Productive </li></ul><ul><li>Wise </li></ul><ul><li>Idealistic </li></ul><ul><li>Fair </li></ul><ul><li>Honest </li></ul><ul><li>Orderly </li></ul><ul><li>Self-disciplined </li></ul><ul><li>Inspiring </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>Wise </li></ul><ul><li>Discriminating </li></ul><ul><li>Serene </li></ul><ul><li>ONES at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Judgmental </li></ul><ul><li>Inflexible </li></ul><ul><li>Dogmatic </li></ul><ul><li>Obsessive-Compulsive </li></ul><ul><li>Critical of others </li></ul><ul><li>Overly serious </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling </li></ul><ul><li>Anxious </li></ul><ul><li>Jealous </li></ul><ul><li>Cynical </li></ul><ul><li>Judgmental </li></ul><ul><li>Self-righteous </li></ul><ul><li>Cold </li></ul><ul><li>Bigoted </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling </li></ul><ul><li>Angry </li></ul><ul><li>Sarcastic </li></ul><ul><li>Dogmatic </li></ul>Motivated by the need to live life the right way, improve yourself and others and avoid danger. MBTI: ISTJ,ENFJ,ENTJ,ISFJ 29. ONE's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being corrupted/evil, defective </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to be good, to have integrity, to be balanced </li></ul><ul><li>NINE-wing: the Idealist </li></ul><ul><li>TWO-wing: the Advocate </li></ul> 30. ONE’s passion & fixation: anger & resentment <ul><li>Suppress reactions and emotions in favor of rationality </li></ul><ul><li>Anger is freeing cathartic energy </li></ul><ul><li>Resentment is rationalized anger. Unacceptable rage is transmuted into acceptable thoughts, from frustration to irritability and resentment </li></ul> 31. ONE’s stress: toward FOUR <ul><li>Under stress, ONES emphasize their belief that perfection is unattainable, and that somehow they are unworthy </li></ul><ul><li>They focus shifts to relationships or emotions, and their feeling of being unlovable </li></ul><ul><li>Can be depressed </li></ul><ul><li>Positive: enhance ONES’ appreciation of and longing for perfection, and opens up their feelings </li></ul> 32. ONE’s security: toward SEVEN <ul><li>Some ONES seek out SEVENS as friends </li></ul><ul><li>Allow themselves to relax into security they can have fun for a while </li></ul> 33. ONE subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: divert energy of anger into anxiety about personal security: getting things right, having exactly what one needs, keeping the job, looking after the family… It is permanent resentful worrying </li></ul><ul><li>Social: ally with the worthy group and support the correct cause; may cause them confusion, frustration or anger at the group and/or at themselves; criticize the group for not being perfect, and themselves for not being able to adapt </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: idealizing the perfect connection, fear that other people will be seen as more attractive, intelligent and desirable. Anger is channeled into jealousy </li></ul> 34. ONE’s relationships <ul><li>Hard to trust the world </li></ul><ul><li>Feel they may be unworthy of friendship because they are not perfect </li></ul><ul><li>Long for the perfect relationship, look to see if they’re doing wrong, if not – resent and blame partner </li></ul> 35. ONE’s virtue & idea: serenity & perfection <ul><li>Serenity: allow all feelings to come and go without judging </li></ul><ul><li>Perfection: realize everything is already perfect even in its imperfection </li></ul> 36. ONE learning 37. ONE growth tips <ul><li>Find a friend or therapist who can help depersonalize issues for which one is blaming one’s self or others </li></ul><ul><li>Join a group which encourages expression of immediate emotions, including anger, in a safe environment </li></ul><ul><li>Notice thinking in terms of either/or, right/wrong and include more sides </li></ul><ul><li>Notice that resentment at others who break the rules may mask a wish to do what they’re doing </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to observe the critical mind in action, and dis-identify with it – use it to remind self of achievements and skills </li></ul><ul><li>Put play and pleasure in list of oughts, until one can allow them for their own sakes </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to relax </li></ul><ul><li>Do not expect others to change immediately </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to recognize the attacks of your superego and how they undermine you rather than helping you </li></ul><ul><li>Get in touch with feelings, particularly unconscious impulses </li></ul> 38. ONE in business <ul><li>The rational, orderly type </li></ul><ul><li>Principled, purposeful, self-controlled, and perfectionistic </li></ul><ul><li>Concerned with maintaining quality and high standards </li></ul><ul><li>Focus on details and like to improve and streamline procedures </li></ul><ul><li>Good at coaching others on how to improve themselves, be more efficient, and do things correctly </li></ul><ul><li>Well-organized and orderly, overly critical of themselves and others </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike waste and sloppiness, but can deteriorate into micromanagement and constant, demoralizing criticism </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, they have good judgment, make wise decisions, and model ethical and responsible behavior. </li></ul> 39. ONE’s leadership: the Idealist <ul><li>A self-observing Idealist can be a wonderful leader: wise, tolerant, balanced, and focused on standards of excellence in ways that provide an exemplary vision for followers. Ones are often the purveyors of quality in an organization. </li></ul><ul><li>When less well-developed, they show their fixation on perfectionism. They carry an internal judging voice, which chastises themselves (or others) for falling short of perfection (preaching) or, in a very healthy individual, invokes higher attainment (teaching). Their driving force is anger, which is typically over-controlled until it erupts as resentment when someone has failed to live up to their expectations. They're good at moral tirades, yet they also show a &quot;running amok&quot; side that allows them to escape their own high standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include reducing the power of their internal critic, channeling anger more effectively, learning to respond to criticism non-defensively, and moving away from black-and-white thinking with positive reframing and creative problem-solving. The key development need for this leadership style is patience, the willingness to accept conditions that do not conform to one's ideal. </li></ul> 40. ONE’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Principle-centered leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Ethics-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Ideal-centered </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Rule-bound </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: Workaholic delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: Factual communicators </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: The uncompromising negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Authority power </li></ul> 41. Famous ONES <ul><li>Mahatma Gandhi, Hilary Clinton, Al Gore, John Paul II, Sandra Day O'Connor, John Bradshaw, Bill Moyers, Martha Stewart, Ralph Nader, Katherine Hepburn, Harrison Ford, Vanessa Redgrave, Jane Fonda, Meryl Streep, George Harrison, Celene Dion, Joan Baez, George Bernard Shaw, Noam Chomsky, Michael Dukakis, Margaret Thatcher, Rudolph Guliani, Jerry Brown, Jane Curtin, Gene Siskel, William F. Buckley, Kenneth Starr, The &quot;Church Lady&quot; (Saturday Night Live), and &quot;Mr. Spock&quot; (Star Trek) </li></ul> 42. 2. The Helper/Giver/Caretaker <ul><li>TWO at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Loving </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>Adaptable </li></ul><ul><li>Insightful </li></ul><ul><li>Generous </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Tuned in how people feel </li></ul><ul><li>Empathic </li></ul><ul><li>Supportive </li></ul><ul><li>Perceptive </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal </li></ul><ul><li>Selfless </li></ul><ul><li>TWO at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Martyr-like </li></ul><ul><li>Indirect </li></ul><ul><li>Manipulative </li></ul><ul><li>Possessive </li></ul><ul><li>Hysterical </li></ul><ul><li>Overly accommodating </li></ul><ul><li>Overly demonstrative (more extraverted Twos) </li></ul><ul><li>Smothering </li></ul><ul><li>Ambitious give-to-get </li></ul><ul><li>Self-sacrificing intrusive </li></ul>Motivated by the need to be loved and appreciated and to express your positive feelings towards others. MBTI: ESFJ,ENFJ,ESFP,ENFP 43. TWO's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being unwanted, unworthy of being loved </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to feel loved </li></ul><ul><li>ONE-wing: the Servant </li></ul><ul><li>THREE-wing: the Host/Hostess </li></ul> 44. TWO’s passion & fixation: pride & flattery <ul><li>Pride: inner certainty that they can fulfill others’ needs </li></ul><ul><li>Flattery: TWOs’ ability to make others feel good by appealing to their inner preferences, and recognizing and supporting their highest potential </li></ul> 45. TWO’s stress: toward EIGHT <ul><li>Domineering, irritable, angry </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid inner anger </li></ul><ul><li>Fight for their own position and resist others’ demand </li></ul> 46. TWO’s security: toward FOUR <ul><li>The increased emotionality is painful </li></ul><ul><li>A release into the self-nurturing and artistic side is energizing </li></ul> 47. TWO subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: securing pride by not asking for help </li></ul><ul><li>Social: attach to the important in group. Ambition: power behind the throne </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: keep going until chosen person is caught </li></ul> 48. TWO’s relationships <ul><li>Dilemma: suffer painful emotions for forgetting self needs </li></ul> 49. TWO’s virtue & idea: humility & will/freedom <ul><li>Humility: celebrate what hey have to offer to the world </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom: follow their true needs </li></ul> 50. TWO learning 51. TWO growth tips <ul><li>Develop interests and activities that are meaningful to one on one’s own, and do them on one’s own </li></ul><ul><li>Make time to be alone and bring attention back inside, for example meditating; notice the anxiety and desire to focus out again </li></ul><ul><li>Notice own achievements and their worth </li></ul><ul><li>Consciously do things well for their own and one’s own sake alone </li></ul><ul><li>Notice flattery and the tendency to be helpless or second to others, and that dependency is manipulation </li></ul><ul><li>Tell people one’s need, and allow them to give it to one’s self: learn to enjoy receiving </li></ul><ul><li>Take care of one’s self, rest </li></ul><ul><li>More conscious of motives when deciding to help </li></ul><ul><li>Ask people what they need before helping them. Help when they ask. Help them to be functioning on their own </li></ul><ul><li>Let it be, do not remind deeds </li></ul> 52. TWO in business <ul><li>The helpful, interpersonal type </li></ul><ul><li>Generous, appreciative, people-pleasing, and possessive </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitive to the needs of others and seek to be of service </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciate the talents of others and act as confidants and guides, good at networking people and services </li></ul><ul><li>Have trouble saying no to requests and tend to become stressed by trying to help others too much </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike impersonal rules and work situations and can deteriorate into favoritism and time-wasting personal over-involvements </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, they are empathetic and generous and help build team interpersonal connections </li></ul> 53. TWO’s leadership: the Mentor <ul><li>The most interpersonally oriented of all the leadership styles, healthy Mentors are unconditionally caring leaders who derive deep satisfaction from seeing and encouraging the development of others; they are typically great supporters of customer service. Well-developed Twos will also be aware of their own needs, which provides balance in their lives and allows them to give freely, without expectation of return. </li></ul><ul><li>Their driving force is pride, which is attached to their self-image as helper; out of this they tend to be in the middle of things, giving help and advice whether others want it or not. When less developed they have a fixation on entitlement and can use manipulation to influence people. If they feel betrayed they may even become vindictive (&quot;after all I've done for you!&quot;). Their key development need is humility, which accompanies true compassion without expectation. </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include acknowledging their own needs, seeing how they contribute to their own workload and saying no, setting clearer boundaries, and asserting their interpersonal power more directly. </li></ul> 54. TWO’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Servant leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Customer satisfaction </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: People-centered decision maker </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Charmer </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: People-centered delegation </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: Interpersonal communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: Manipulative negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Reward power </li></ul> 55. Famous TWOS <ul><li>Mother Teresa, Barbara Bush, Eleanor Roosevelt, Leo Buscaglia, Monica Lewinsky, Bill Cosby, Barry Manilow, Lionel Richie, Kenny G., Luciano Pavarotti, Lillian Carter, Sammy Davis, Jr., Martin Sheen, Robert Fulghum, Alan Alda, Richard Thomas, Jack Paar, Sally Jessy Raphael, Bishop Desmond Tutu, Ann Landers, &quot;Melanie Hamilton&quot; (Gone With the Wind). and &quot;Dr. McCoy&quot; (Star Trek) </li></ul> 56. 3. The Performer/Achiever/Motivator/Succeeder <ul><li>THREES at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Optimistic </li></ul><ul><li>Confident </li></ul><ul><li>Industrious </li></ul><ul><li>Efficient </li></ul><ul><li>Self-propelled </li></ul><ul><li>Energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Practical </li></ul><ul><li>Empathic </li></ul><ul><li>Socially conscious </li></ul><ul><li>Able to enliven </li></ul><ul><li>Deep connection to people and worthy goals </li></ul><ul><li>THREES at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Deceptive </li></ul><ul><li>Narcissistic </li></ul><ul><li>Pretentious </li></ul><ul><li>Vain </li></ul><ul><li>Superficial </li></ul><ul><li>Vindictive </li></ul><ul><li>Overly competitive </li></ul><ul><li>Dominating </li></ul><ul><li>Go-getters </li></ul>Motivated by the need to be productive, to achieve success, and to avoid failure. MBTI: ESTP,ENTP,ENTJ,ESTJ 57. THREE's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being worthless </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to feel valuable and worthwhile </li></ul><ul><li>TWO-wing: the Charmer </li></ul><ul><li>FOUR-wing: the Professional </li></ul> 58. THREE’s passion & fixation: deceit & vanity <ul><li>Select arenas which gain approval of people they want to be accepted by. They deceive themselves that roles is ‘who they are’ </li></ul><ul><li>Vanity: only stop doing when they run out </li></ul> 59. THREE’s stress: toward NINE <ul><li>Stress of THREE: public failure, taking on far too much, illness which forces them to stop, inactivity </li></ul><ul><li>Lose focus and confidence </li></ul><ul><li>Swayed or distracted and upset that can’t promote themselves </li></ul> 60. THREE’s security: toward SIX <ul><li>SIX is central fear type, so THREE finds it so hard to relax and do nothing </li></ul> 61. THREE subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: focus on material security. Ultimate success is always in the future </li></ul><ul><li>Social: their status in the group. Goal is targeted for the potential prestige </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: appear absolutely masculine/feminine </li></ul> 62. THREE’s relationships <ul><li>Relationships can be backing up image </li></ul> 63. THREE’s virtue & idea: honesty & hope <ul><li>Honesty: inner state in which there is no need to find a role to identify with </li></ul><ul><li>Hope: able to let go and allow things to be done through them rather than by them </li></ul><ul><li>Who experience hope and honesty can turn their leading, achieving and motivating skills to the service of other people, and experience the unconditional love they have always longed for </li></ul> 64. THREE learning 65. THREE growth tips <ul><li>Stop from time to time and ask ‘What am I feeling?’ </li></ul><ul><li>Take time out to stop and be: go for walks (but without a goal!), stare at the sunset, learn to meditate for its own sake rather than as a task </li></ul><ul><li>Ask trusted friends to tell when they feel one’s not being real, or one’s fudging an issue, and listen even if they seem wrong </li></ul><ul><li>Notice one’s self changing image to please, and ask ‘Is this who I am, or am I going for the image?’ </li></ul><ul><li>Work on valuing empathy and connection as highly as status </li></ul><ul><li>Ask one’s self what really matters, in work and leisure, and make time to pursue it </li></ul><ul><li>Be honest about feelings and needs </li></ul><ul><li>Connect to someone one cares about </li></ul><ul><li>Involve in projects that help empowering true value and identity </li></ul><ul><li>Stop doing the acceptable just to be accepted </li></ul> 66. THREE in business <ul><li>The adaptable, ambitious type </li></ul><ul><li>Focused, excelling, driven, and image-conscious </li></ul><ul><li>Know how to work efficiently to get the job done according to customer expectations </li></ul><ul><li>Often attractive, charming, and energetic, are conscious of the image they project of themselves as well as of their team and company </li></ul><ul><li>Like getting recognition and are attracted to success and positions of prestige </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive and workaholic, driven by the need for status and personal advancement, deteriorating into cutting corners to stay ahead </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, they are accomplished and admirable, often seen as inspiring role models by others </li></ul> 67. THREE’s leadership: the Star <ul><li>Star leaders are often expansive, risk-taking go-getters who ensure high productivity for their organizations. Formidable models for others, they are efficient and supremely goal-oriented; consequently, they tend to rise to top organizational levels, or to run their own companies. </li></ul><ul><li>What under-developed Threes personify for all of us is our image-making. They're good at self-promotion and can be perceived as showcasing themselves at the expense of the team. Threes tend to look outward for their reflection in the eyes of others--and their inner life can be lacking. Their driving force is vanity, which shows up in the fixation of self-deception (e.g., convincing oneself that a failure to involve the team in a major business coup was not important because of the results achieved). </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include learning to collaborate instead of compete, clarifying their own values/developing internal criteria (vs. external validation), learning from failure, and accessing their feelings. Their key development need is truthfulness, speaking from the essential self and not through personality needs. </li></ul> 68. THREE’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Entrepreneurial leader </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Achievement oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Success-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Motivating </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: The vain delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: Persuasive communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: Persuasive negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Image power </li></ul> 69. Famous THREES <ul><li>Bill Clinton, Oprah Winfrey, Jane Pauley, Michael Landon, Tony Robbins, Tom Cruise, Barbra Streisand, Sharon Stone, Madonna, Shirley MacLaine, Sting, Paul McCartney, Dick Clark, Whitney Houston, Ted Danson, Michael Jordan, Shania Twain, Sylvester Stallone, Arnold Schwarznegger, Billy Dee Williams, Kathy Lee Gifford, Truman Capote, and O.J. Simpson </li></ul> 70. 4. The Romantic/Individualist/Artist/Designer <ul><li>FOURS at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Warm </li></ul><ul><li>Compassionate </li></ul><ul><li>Introspective </li></ul><ul><li>Expressive </li></ul><ul><li>Creative </li></ul><ul><li>Intuitive </li></ul><ul><li>Supportive </li></ul><ul><li>Refined </li></ul><ul><li>Charismatic </li></ul><ul><li>Empathic </li></ul><ul><li>FOURS at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Depressed </li></ul><ul><li>Self-conscious </li></ul><ul><li>Guilt-ridden </li></ul><ul><li>Moralistic </li></ul><ul><li>Withdrawn </li></ul><ul><li>Stubborn </li></ul><ul><li>Moody </li></ul><ul><li>Self-absorbed </li></ul><ul><li>Moralistic </li></ul><ul><li>Demanding attention for their pain </li></ul>Motivated by the need to understand your feelings and to be understood, to search for the meaning of life and to avoid being ordinary. MBTI: INFJ,INFP,ENFJ,ISFP 71. FOUR's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: not having identity or personal significance </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to create an identity </li></ul><ul><li>THREE-wing: the Aristocrat </li></ul><ul><li>FIVE-wing: the Bohemian </li></ul> 72. FOUR’s passion & fixation: envy & melancholy <ul><li>Envy: something’s mission, yearning to fill the emptiness </li></ul><ul><li>Melancholy: bitter-sweet favor. When FOURS experience joy it is passionate and deep, but includes the knowledge that its opposite is never far away </li></ul> 73. FOUR’s stress: toward TWO <ul><li>Feel the need to change themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Push-pull way of relating, need to attract people and be approved of </li></ul> 74. FOUR’s security: toward ONE <ul><li>FOURS are idealists in the realm of feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Add perfectionism to personality and become critical </li></ul> 75. FOUR subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: take risks, live life recklessly. To really be alive means to experience life to the full, to be willing to take whatever comes along and ride with it </li></ul><ul><li>Social: fear for not being good enough so people will reject. Apply creativity to their involvement </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: competitive </li></ul> 76. FOUR’s relationships <ul><li>Emotional experience vary so widely and intensely </li></ul><ul><li>Push-pull habit </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal and generous to real friend </li></ul> 77. FOUR virtue & idea: equanimity & origin <ul><li>Equanimity: being harmonious and complete in oneself </li></ul><ul><li>They are part of holy origin, celebrate and let that creative source express itself through them in their lives </li></ul> 78. FOUR learning 79. FOUR growth tips <ul><li>Take up a body-based activity to learn to ground one’s self </li></ul><ul><li>When emotions become very strong about something, question them by tracking back to the first feeling which triggered them: it may be different from what one feels at the moment </li></ul><ul><li>Notice attention going to what is missing, and learn to value the positive aspects of what is here and now </li></ul><ul><li>Remind one’s self ‘abandonment’ was in the past and is not inevitable </li></ul><ul><li>Recognize specialty and self-absorption as a way of masking fears of abandonment: focus on what is important to someone else </li></ul><ul><li>Discover in one’s self the qualities which one envy in others </li></ul><ul><li>Drift off feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid putting off things until in the right mood </li></ul><ul><li>Self-discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid lengthy conversations in mind </li></ul> 80. FOUR in business <ul><li>The introspective, artistic type </li></ul><ul><li>Expressive, dramatic, self-absorbed, and temperamental </li></ul><ul><li>Deliver personalized service and/or develop distinctive products known for their refinement and sense of style </li></ul><ul><li>Uncompromising in their pursuit of the right effect, word, or design and of gauging the personal impact of a product </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike tasks that they feel are not creative or give them room for their personal imprint </li></ul><ul><li>Hypersensitive to criticism and can deteriorate into moodiness and erratic work habits </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, they bring intuition and creativity into the workplace and enrich it with their sense of depth, style, and appreciation of the personal dimension. </li></ul> 81. FOUR’s leadership: the Innovator <ul><li>Innovators are vital to the health of an organization because they are able to view things from a new slant and are not bound by tradition; they can keep an organization from slowly dying out of untested and outdated assumptions. </li></ul><ul><li>More in touch with their feelings than other types, they are in danger of sinking into moodiness if they meet with resistance to their ideas. The same talent that allows Fours to &quot;look outside the box&quot; can lead them to wonder why they never see things the way others do, and subsequently to question if they are flawed--their conversation is ripe with sad stories. Their driving force is envy, which shows up in the fixation of dissatisfaction, a perception that &quot;the grass is always greener somewhere else.&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include focusing more on strengths and resources and less on the &quot;tragedy&quot; of life, learning to develop the possibilities of their current jobs, shifting their moods through physical exercise or creative outlets, reframing self-criticism in more positive ways, and championing a program or process they believe in. Their key development need is equanimity, the ability to live in the moment. </li></ul> 82. FOUR’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Charismatic leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Innovation-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Feelings-centered </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Revolutionary change </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: The mundane delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: The aesthetic communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: The elegant negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Aesthetic power </li></ul> 83. Famous FOURS <ul><li>Ingmar Bergman, Alan Watts, Sarah McLachlan, Alanis Morrisette, Paul Simon, Jeremy Irons, Patrick Stewart, Joseph Fiennes, Martha Graham, Bob Dylan, Miles Davis, Johnny Depp, Anne Rice, Rudolph Nureyev, J.D. Salinger, Anaîs Nin, Marcel Proust, Maria Callas, Tennessee Williams, Edgar Allan Poe, Annie Lennox, Prince, Michael Jackson, Virginia Woolf, Judy Garland, &quot;Blanche DuBois&quot; (Streetcar Named Desire), Thomas Merton </li></ul> 84. 5. The Observer/Thinker/Investigator <ul><li>FIVES at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Analytical </li></ul><ul><li>Persevering </li></ul><ul><li>Sensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Wise </li></ul><ul><li>Objective </li></ul><ul><li>Perceptive </li></ul><ul><li>Self-contained </li></ul><ul><li>Dedicated </li></ul><ul><li>Creative thinking </li></ul><ul><li>FIVES at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectually arrogant </li></ul><ul><li>Stingy </li></ul><ul><li>Stubborn </li></ul><ul><li>Distant </li></ul><ul><li>Critical of others </li></ul><ul><li>Unassertive </li></ul><ul><li>Negative </li></ul><ul><li>Withdrawn </li></ul><ul><li>Distrustful </li></ul><ul><li>Out of touch </li></ul>Motivated by the need to know everything and understand the universe, to be self-sufficient and left alone, and to avoid not having the answer or looking foolish. MBTI: INTP,ISTP,INTJ,ISTJ 85. FIVE's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being useless, helpless, incapable </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to be capable and competent </li></ul><ul><li>FOUR-wing: the Iconoclast </li></ul><ul><li>SIX-wing: the Problem Solver </li></ul> 86. FIVE’s passion & fixation: avarice & stinginess <ul><li>Avarice: feel the lacking the means for safe survival. Not usually material but information </li></ul><ul><li>Stinginess: The greatest necessities are time, energy & personal space. If demanded, they respond calmly to go away </li></ul> 87. FIVE’s stress: toward SEVEN <ul><li>Scan for possible escapes </li></ul> 88. FIVE’s security: toward EIGHT <ul><li>Take charge, be definite and forthcoming </li></ul><ul><li>Access anger </li></ul><ul><li>Physical enjoyment through touch </li></ul> 89. FIVE subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: my home is my castle. Create a warm, secure place where they have everything </li></ul><ul><li>Social: collect totem figures or totemic information </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: exchange confidences enables them to feel safe. Confidentiality in physical expression </li></ul> 90. FIVE’s relationships <ul><li>Crave emotional connection </li></ul><ul><li>Back off from invasive or demanding </li></ul><ul><li>Attracted towards a person who allows them their own space </li></ul><ul><li>Need for privacy </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike being at the center of attention </li></ul> 91. FIVE’s virtue & idea: non-attachment & omniscience <ul><li>Non-attachment allows feelings, experiences and things to come and go, knowing that the universe is abundant. Allowing energy to flow more freely and sharing it makes self-renewing </li></ul><ul><li>Omniscience is the mind in which all knowing is available without thinking for accumulating knowledge. Discover they have access to wisdoms, safety is found in an inner experience of already knowing all they need </li></ul> 92. FIVE learning 93. FIVE growth tips <ul><li>Take up a physical practice which helps ground in one’s body </li></ul><ul><li>Join a group which encourages self-disclosure </li></ul><ul><li>Let one’s self feel physical sensations and emotions as they happen </li></ul><ul><li>Notice how one’s mind detaches from feelings and sorts things into compartments, and how secrecy and superiority create separation </li></ul><ul><li>Cultivate here-and-now behavior, particularly allowing one’s self luxuries </li></ul><ul><li>Notice when one is controlling space/time/energy and manipulating others through restricting what and when one will give: start to allow the control to drop </li></ul><ul><li>Stay connected with physicality </li></ul><ul><li>Meditate, jogging, yoga, dancing </li></ul><ul><li>Learn from peers </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid distractions from non-supportive projects </li></ul><ul><li>Accept and work through conflicts </li></ul> 94. FIVE in business <ul><li>The perceptive, provocative type </li></ul><ul><li>Curious, innovative, secretive, and eccentric </li></ul><ul><li>Tireless learners and experimenters, especially in specialized or technical matters </li></ul><ul><li>Like to understand in detail, spend time on research, and follow their curiosity wherever it leads </li></ul><ul><li>Highly analytical and preoccupied with discovery, not paying attention to project time constraints and relationships </li></ul><ul><li>Deteriorate into arrogance and non-communication, intellectual bickering and oneupsmanship </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, Fives are visionary pioneers, bringing strikingly new ideas and profound depth to their work. </li></ul> 95. FIVE’s leadership: the Synthesizer <ul><li>Because of their ability to take in the whole picture and integrate its components in creative ways, well-developed Synthesizers can be consummate strategists and visionaries. Often very bright, they are extremely capable of influencing others through their knowledge. </li></ul><ul><li>Sometimes they sound like they're giving a dissertation. Although Fives can be profound and passionate leaders, they tend to disdain the role of emotions in human interaction. They are the most independent of the nine styles and prefer to be surrounded by other highly capable people who need no direction or external reinforcement. Their driving force is hoarding, which shows up particularly in their fixation on detachment from emotions, a &quot;stinginess&quot; of feelings. </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include debating less and probing/ listening more with the goal of mutually satisfying solutions, taking their role as coach more seriously--including giving attention to group process (meetings, teamwork, etc.), and affirming others' positive efforts. Their key development need is nonattachment, engaging with others without fear of being overwhelmed. </li></ul> 96. FIVE’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Strategic leaders </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Expertise-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Rational decision-making </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Aggressive change manager </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: The remote delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: The impersonal communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: The unemotional negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Expert power </li></ul> 97. Famous FIVES <ul><li>Albert Einstein, Stephen Hawking, Bill Gates, Georgia O'Keefe, Stanley Kubrick, John Lennon, Lily Tomlin, Gary Larson, Laurie Anderson, Merce Cunningham, Meredith Monk, James Joyce, Bjšrk, Susan Sontag, Emily Dickenson, Agatha Christie, Ursula K. LeGuin, Jane Goodall, Glenn Gould, John Cage, Bobby Fischer, Tim Burton, David Lynch, Stephen King, Clive Barker, Trent Reznor, Friedrich Nietzsche, Vincent Van Gogh, Kurt Cobain, Jodie Foster, and &quot;Fox Mulder&quot; (X Files) </li></ul> 98. 6. The Devil’s Advocate/Questioner/Loyalist/Networker/Defender/Troubleshooter <ul><li>SIXES at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal </li></ul><ul><li>Likable </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>Warm </li></ul><ul><li>Compassionate </li></ul><ul><li>Witty </li></ul><ul><li>Practical </li></ul><ul><li>Helpful </li></ul><ul><li>Responsible </li></ul><ul><li>Productive </li></ul><ul><li>Imaginative </li></ul><ul><li>Protective </li></ul><ul><li>SIXES at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Hyper-vigilant </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling </li></ul><ul><li>Unpredictable </li></ul><ul><li>Judgmental </li></ul><ul><li>Paranoid </li></ul><ul><li>Defensive </li></ul><ul><li>Rigid </li></ul><ul><li>Self-defeating </li></ul><ul><li>Testy </li></ul><ul><li>Ineffective </li></ul><ul><li>Inflexible </li></ul>Motivated by the need for security, to feel taken care of, or to control your fears. MBTI: ISFJ,ESFJ,INFP,ENFP 99. SIX's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being without support and guidance </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to have security and support </li></ul><ul><li>FIVE-wing: the Defender </li></ul><ul><li>SEVEN-wing: the Buddy </li></ul> 100. SIX’s passion & fixation: fear/doubt & cowardice <ul><li>Doubt masks fear. 2 types of SIXES: fight (counter-phobic) or flight (phobic) </li></ul><ul><li>Coward in imagination: anticipate negative outcome and procrastinate </li></ul> 101. SIX’s stress: toward THREE <ul><li>Stop procrastinating, apply imagination to getting the job done </li></ul><ul><li>Working to illness reinforces distance from emotion </li></ul> 102. SIX’s security: toward NINE <ul><li>Soft, warm and loving </li></ul><ul><li>Non-initiation reinforces tendency to inaction </li></ul> 103. SIX subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: disarm potential hostility; be warm, giving, affectionate and personally loyal </li></ul><ul><li>Social: duty is important, ally with and actively support socially worthy group; focus on under-privileged </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: affect others so as not to be affected, through strength and/or attractiveness and love of beauty </li></ul> 104. SIX’s relationships <ul><li>Look for whom to unite </li></ul><ul><li>Ask question without saying much about themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Express love and friendship through actions </li></ul> 105. SIX’s virtue & idea: courage & faith <ul><li>Courage: trusting body’s and heart’s intuition enough to act. In midst of calamitous danger the simply know what to do and have done it. Allow immediate life to affect them respond appropriately </li></ul><ul><li>Faith: practicing trust, focus on positive experience without questioning its hidden deaths </li></ul> 106. SIX learning 107. SIX growth tips <ul><li>Take up a physical practice to help bring awareness into body and out of head; notice being braced to face the worse, and relax </li></ul><ul><li>Ask one’s self from time to time ‘Am I imagining this? Is it a genuine intuition or a projection?’ Ask friends for feedback and a reality check </li></ul><ul><li>Take time to remember and enjoy past successes and skills, and congratulate one’s self on present ones </li></ul><ul><li>Notice how doubt shuts out relationships (‘Can I trust them?’) and practice trusting and having faith </li></ul><ul><li>Use imagination: to create pleasant options, also to project threatening scenarios to the improbable limit so one can defuse and laugh at them </li></ul><ul><li>Counter-phobic Sixes: before going into action, ask one’s self if it is appropriate, and whether one has anything to prove </li></ul><ul><li>Work creatively to be more present to anxiety </li></ul><ul><li>Avoid pessimism </li></ul><ul><li>Identify what makes the anxiety </li></ul><ul><li>Work to become more trusting </li></ul> 108. SIX in business <ul><li>The engaging, loyal type </li></ul><ul><li>Likable, responsible, anxious, and suspicious </li></ul><ul><li>Are diligent and reliable workers </li></ul><ul><li>Build alliances and partnerships that help orient their co-workers and get things done </li></ul><ul><li>Are able to assess the motivations and relative merits of others and scan the business environment for potential problems </li></ul><ul><li>Dislike taking risks and want consensus and predictability </li></ul><ul><li>Indecisive and have difficulty taking responsibility or action without group authority and can deteriorate into evasiveness and blaming others </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, Sixes are self-reliant, independent, and courageous, often calling a group back to its root values. </li></ul> 109. SIX’s leadership: the Partner <ul><li>Partners at their best are highly team-oriented leaders and excellent managers who bring out the best in everyone. These are energetic executives who attend to interdependent organizational needs, which shows up in their language as thoughts about the group. </li></ul><ul><li>Their driving force is fear, which is manifested in less well-developed Sixes as a fixation on accusation of others (particularly those in authority). Sixes also look for hidden agendas, and experience self-doubt. They may procrastinate and/or blurt out their feelings with a kind of reckless courage (driven by their anxieties), and then worry that they've shot themselves in the foot--and they may have. The good news is that they challenge others in ways that hold them accountable; the bad news is that they're always looking for the bad news! </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include getting a reality check on their fears, empowering themselves vs. blaming others, focusing more on possibilities vs. worries, and centering their verbal presentations on a central theme and several key points. Their key development need is courage, consistent with a certain kind of &quot;morality&quot;: recognizing their own contribution to situations instead of playing &quot;victim&quot;. </li></ul> 110. SIX’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Conservative leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Risk-averse strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Decision through analysis </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Traditionalist </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: The insecure delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: The cautious communicators </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: The inflexible negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Legitimate Power </li></ul> 111. Famous SIXES <ul><li>Robert F. Kennedy, Malcolm X, Princess Diana, George H. W. Bush, Tom Hanks, Bruce Springsteen, Candice Bergen, Gilda Radner, Meg Ryan, Helen Hunt, Mel Gibson, Patrick Swayze, Julia Roberts, Phil Donahue, Jay Leno, John Goodman, Diane Keaton, Woody Allen, David Letterman, Andy Rooney, Jessica Lange, Tom Clancy, J. Edgar Hoover, Richard Nixon, and &quot;George Costanza&quot; (Seinfeld) </li></ul> 112. 7. The Enthusiast/Adventurer/Generalist/Visionary/Epicure/Materialist <ul><li>SEVENS at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Fun-loving </li></ul><ul><li>Spontaneous </li></ul><ul><li>Imaginative </li></ul><ul><li>Productive </li></ul><ul><li>Enthusiastic </li></ul><ul><li>Quick </li></ul><ul><li>Confident </li></ul><ul><li>Charming </li></ul><ul><li>Curious </li></ul><ul><li>Perceptive </li></ul><ul><li>Generous </li></ul><ul><li>Creative </li></ul><ul><li>Caring </li></ul><ul><li>SEVENS at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Narcissistic </li></ul><ul><li>Impulsive </li></ul><ul><li>Unfocused </li></ul><ul><li>Rebellious </li></ul><ul><li>Undisciplined </li></ul><ul><li>Possessive </li></ul><ul><li>Manic </li></ul><ul><li>Self-destructive </li></ul><ul><li>Restless </li></ul><ul><li>Self-centered </li></ul><ul><li>Grabbing </li></ul><ul><li>Mendacious </li></ul><ul><li>Hypocritical </li></ul><ul><li>Ruthless </li></ul>Motivated by the need to be happy and plan fun things, to contribute to the world, and to avoid pain and suffering. MBTI: ESTP,ESFP,ENTP,ENFP 113. SEVEN's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being deprived and in pain </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to have needs fulfilled </li></ul><ul><li>SIX-wing: the Entertainer </li></ul><ul><li>EIGHT-wing: the Realist </li></ul> 114. SEVEN’s passion & fixation: gluttony & planning <ul><li>Gluttony: focus on myriad enjoyable possibilities. Sample a little of all the best available </li></ul><ul><li>Planning: more fun planning for everything than doing, a way of being open to all possibilites </li></ul> 115. SEVEN’s stress: toward ONE <ul><li>Firm boundaries leads to them becoming irritable, nit-picking, angry at anything, self-critical </li></ul> 116. SEVEN’s security: toward FIVE <ul><li>Satisfied to take a more background role </li></ul> 117. SEVEN subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: gluttony expressed by forming a family of like-minded people </li></ul><ul><li>Social: go to the happiness of the group, short-term sacrifice own enjoyment for the group </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: fascination to new people and their new possibilities </li></ul> 118. SEVEN’s relationships <ul><li>Value friendships and family </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal, supporting, stimulating </li></ul> 119. SEVEN’s virtue & idea: sobriety and holy work <ul><li>Sobriety: emotions are focused and single-pointed. The complete experience is only available within themselves </li></ul><ul><li>Holy work is the state which is called ‘the condition of complete simplicity costing not less than everything’ </li></ul> 120. SEVEN learning 121. SEVEN growth tips <ul><li>Take up a meditation practice; notice the boredom factor in personal growth (been there, done that) and stay steady with it </li></ul><ul><li>Realize that pleasure is only half the story: remind one’s self to may be missing something, and include painful experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Notice one’s mind racing and reaching for options: slow down and focus on the present moment whether pleasant or painful; ask one’s self what one is avoiding </li></ul><ul><li>Let go of some of the options: a deeper focus on fewer things may bring one more valuable experiences </li></ul><ul><li>Notice one’s self rationalizing a re-framing, particularly when criticized or pinned down – ask one’s self: ‘What are the facts?’ </li></ul><ul><li>Learn to include criticism and conflict </li></ul><ul><li>Observe impulses rather than giving in to them </li></ul><ul><li>Appreciate silence and solitude </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities may come back again </li></ul><ul><li>Quality over quantity </li></ul><ul><li>Make sure what wanted is good for the long run </li></ul> 122. SEVEN in business <ul><li>The accomplished, upbeat type </li></ul><ul><li>Spontaneous, versatile, impulsive, and scattered </li></ul><ul><li>Thrive on change, variety, excitement, and innovation </li></ul><ul><li>Articulate and humorous, they are able to get others to support their ideas </li></ul><ul><li>In touch with the latest trends and are constantly looking for new possibilities and options </li></ul><ul><li>Natural multi-taskers but can also get overextended and lack follow-through </li></ul><ul><li>Deteriorate into endless talk and distractions, scattering their energy and talents and leaving many projects unfinished </li></ul><ul><li>At their best, Sevens focus on worthwhile goals and become highly productive and accomplished. </li></ul> 123. SEVEN’s leadership: the Futurist <ul><li>Charming and easy to talk to, highly evolved Futurists are the organization's cheerleaders because of their natural optimism. They focus on long-term perspective and possibilities. Equality is important to them, so Sevens sometimes have to work around organizational constraints. </li></ul><ul><li>Less developed leaders of this type can seem egotistical because they love to tell anecdotes and may forget to invite others to talk. They're sometimes perceived as lacking analytical ability because of oversimplifying or skating over the surface. The Seven's driving force is gluttony, a seeking of pleasure in order to avoid pain; consequently they are over-focused (fixated) on enthusiasm (the &quot;bad&quot; news is that they only want to hear the good news) and uneasy activity. </li></ul><ul><li>Developmental skills include contingency planning for problems, eliciting and accepting feedback, using negative reframing to counter their optimism, and -- particularly -- disciplining themselves to follow through on their own development (it's hard work)! Their key development need is temperance: seeking moderation and letting go of materialism. </li></ul> 124. SEVEN’s management <ul><li>Leadership: Visionary leadership </li></ul><ul><li>Strategy: Possibility-oriented </li></ul><ul><li>Decision Making: Participatory </li></ul><ul><li>Managing Change: Facilitator </li></ul><ul><li>Delegating: the optimistic delegator </li></ul><ul><li>Communication: the Diplomatic Communicator </li></ul><ul><li>Negotiation: The charming negotiator </li></ul><ul><li>Power: Referent power </li></ul> 125. Famous SEVENS <ul><li>John F. Kennedy, Benjamin Franklin, Leonard Bernstein, Leonardo DiCaprio, Kate Winslet, Elizabeth Taylor, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Steven Spielberg, Federico Fellini, Richard Feynman, Timothy Leary, Robin Williams, Jim Carey, Mike Myers, Cameron Diaz, Bette Midler, Chuck Berry, Elton John, Mick Jagger, Gianni Versace, Liza Minelli, Joan Collins, Malcolm Forbes, Noel Coward, Sarah Ferguson, Larry King, Joan Rivers, Regis Philbin, Howard Stern, John Belushi, and &quot;Auntie Mame&quot; (Mame) </li></ul> 126. 8. The Challenger/Asserter/Protector/Boss/Activator/Leader <ul><li>EIGHTS at their BEST </li></ul><ul><li>Direct </li></ul><ul><li>Authoritative </li></ul><ul><li>Loyal </li></ul><ul><li>Energetic </li></ul><ul><li>Earthy </li></ul><ul><li>Protective </li></ul><ul><li>Self-confident </li></ul><ul><li>Deeply loving </li></ul><ul><li>Empowering </li></ul><ul><li>EIGHTS at their WORST </li></ul><ul><li>Controlling </li></ul><ul><li>Rebellious </li></ul><ul><li>Insensitive </li></ul><ul><li>Domineering </li></ul><ul><li>Self-centered </li></ul><ul><li>Skeptical </li></ul><ul><li>Aggressive </li></ul><ul><li>Cynics </li></ul><ul><li>Bullies </li></ul><ul><li>Law-breakers </li></ul><ul><li>Forcing, lying, violent </li></ul>Motivated by the need to be self-reliant and strong, to make an impact on the world, and to avoid being weak. MBTI: ENTJ,ESTJ,ENTP,ESTP 127. EIGHT's fear - desire - wings <ul><li>Fear: being harmed or controlled </li></ul><ul><li>Desire: to protect one’s self </li></ul><ul><li>SEVEN-wing: the Maverick </li></ul><ul><li>NINE-wing: the Bear </li></ul> 128. EIGHT’s passion & fixation: lust & vengeance <ul><li>Lust for life: defuse energy and release strain of constant control, one way of self-forgetting </li></ul><ul><li>Vengeance: right the wrong </li></ul> 129. EIGHT’s stress: toward FIVE <ul><li>Withdraw to think things through and regain balance </li></ul> 130. EIGHT’s security: toward TWO <ul><li>More compliant, giving, easily affected </li></ul><ul><li>Protective and empowering instincts are magnified </li></ul><ul><li>Brings insecurities to retreat </li></ul> 131. EIGHT subtypes <ul><li>Self-preservation: ensure they have what they need to survive in a satisfactory way </li></ul><ul><li>Social: networking, introduce friends to each other, provide mutual support </li></ul><ul><li>Sexual: look for whom they can trust enough to surrender to and let go of control; vulnerable to betrayal </li></ul> 132. EIGHT’s relationships <ul><li>Inde
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